Vitamin K2 and Stroke

February 20th, 2014 by Jack Norris RD

Summary

In the one study to date that has examined the intake of vitamin K2 and incidence of stroke, no association was found.

I was getting ready to publish my conclusions regarding vitamin K2 and cardiovascular disease and decided to check PubMed one last time to make sure nothing had come out recently. Sure enough, there was a paper on vitamin K2 and stroke from December!

This study combined the data from the two Dutch cohorts of EPIC, Prospect and MORGEN (1). After excluding people with prevalent stroke or cardiovascular disease at baseline, they had a study population of 35,476 men and women. The average daily intake of vitamin K2 was 49 µg in the highest one-fourth versus 16 µg in the lowest one-fourth.

There was no association found between vitamin K2 and incidence of stroke either with all stroke combined, or with ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke analyzed separately. None of the vitamin K2 sub-types were significantly associated with a reduced risk for stroke.

The researchers considered this finding to be in contrast to some previous population studies that found fermented dairy products to be associated with a lower risk of stroke.

They also pointed out that recent research has suggested that artery calcification (which may be associated with lower intakes of vitamin K2) may not be a cause of stroke as it is for heart disease, and that might explain some of the inverse associations found between vitamin K2 and heart disease whereas none was found for stroke in this study.

This was the only study they, or I, are aware of examining the association between vitamin K2 and stroke.

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References

1. Vissers LE, Dalmeijer GW, Boer JM, Monique Verschuren WM, van der Schouw YT, Beulens JW. Intake of dietary phylloquinone and menaquinones and risk of stroke. J Am Heart Assoc. 2013 Dec 10;2(6):e000455. | link

Low Carb, Eco-Atkins Diet after 6 Months

February 14th, 2014 by Jack Norris RD

Summary

Eco-Atkins is a vegan, low-carbohydrate diet. After 6 months on the diet, people lost 15 lbs and LDL cholesterol levels went from 174 to 157 mg/dl. Compliance was not high.

In 2009, a 4-week clinical trial putting overweight people on a low-carbohydrate vegan diet, known as the Eco-Atkins, was released. I mentioned it in my article Of Oil and Ethics.

It was promising because after 2 weeks, LDL cholesterol levels went from 174 to 134 mg/dl. After 4 weeks, LDL cholesterol levels appeared to be stuck, at an average of 136 mg/dl. Participants also lost weight and had some other improvements, and they reported feeling more satisfied than did the participants in the control diet (a lacto-ovo, semi-low-fat vegetarian diet).

It took the researchers awhile to publish it, but they just released a report on what happened to the participants after 6 months (1). Unfortunately…not much. Their LDL cholesterol levels were back up to 157 mg/dl at the end of 6 months. They had still lost some body weight (15 lbs) and their risk for heart disease had improved over baseline.

The analysis was done on an intention-to-treat basis which means that people who didn’t stick with the diet were included in the final results (or their numbers were estimated). Overall diet compliance was fairly low at only about 34% of the recommended foods.

For those on Eco-Atkins, percentage of fat went up from their normal diet, but only from 34.4 to 36.0% of calories. And when you consider that their calories went down, from 1,840 to 1,388, their total fat intake actually went down, from 70 to 56 g.

The authors suggested that increases in monounsaturated fat (MUFA) could account for some of the improvements in heart disease risk factors, but their MUFA fat intake, while increasing slightly on a percentage basis, actually went down in total, from 27 to 23 g.

When you add in the fact that fiber increased from 12 to 21 g, it seems that all of the improvements could simply be attributed to a lower intake of calories and an increase in fiber.

Still, the Eco-Atkins did better than the 28% fat, lacto-ovo vegetarian diet. However, at baseline, the participants in the lacto-ovo group had an average daily caloric intake of 1,598, which was 242 calories less than the Eco-Atkins dieters. During the study, the lacto-ovo vegetarian dieters ate a very similar amount of calories to the Eco-Atkins dieters (1,347 and 1,388 respectively). As such, the Eco-Atkins dieters had a lot more room for improvement which could possibly explain why they did somewhat better.

In conclusion, this trial provides evidence that fiber is good and calories are bad for lowering cholesterol and losing weight.

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References

1. Jenkins DJ, Wong JM, Kendall CW, Esfahani A, Ng VW, Leong TC, Faulkner DA, Vidgen E, Paul G, Mukherjea R, Krul ES, Singer W. Effect of a 6-month vegan low-carbohydrate (‘Eco-Atkins’) diet on cardiovascular risk factors and body weight in hyperlipidaemic adults: a randomised controlled trial. BMJ Open. 2014 Feb 5;4(2):e003505. | link

Zinc Supplements: Which are Absorbed Best?

February 11th, 2014 by Jack Norris RD

Summary

Zinc citrate and zinc gluconate are absorbed well by apparently healthy people. Some apparently healthy people cannot absorb zinc oxide.

A 2014 study from Switzerland compared the absorption from various forms of zinc supplements (1). Measuring zinc absorption in 15 healthy volunteers, they found the following median absorption rates:

zinc citrate – 61% (range: 57–71)
zinc gluconate – 61% (range: 51–72)
zinc oxide – 50% (range: 41–58)

The lower absorption from zinc oxide was almost entirely due to three participants who absorbed much lower amounts, with two absorbing almost none.

The authors reviewed other studies which indicated that zinc sulfate and zinc acetate might also be absorbed well.

Interestingly, they noted that none of the study subjects were vegan. They didn’t explain why they pointed this out, but it’s good to know that vegans are on their radar.

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References

1. Wegmüller R, Tay F, Zeder C, Brnic M, Hurrell RF. Zinc absorption by young adults from supplemental zinc citrate is comparable with that from zinc gluconate and higher than from zinc oxide. J Nutr. 2014 Feb;144(2):132-6. | link

Zinc Supplements and the Common Cold

February 10th, 2014 by Jack Norris RD

In June of 2013, the Cochrane Collaboration updated their meta-analysis of double-blinded, placebo-controlled randomized controlled trials testing whether zinc is useful in treating or preventing the common cold (1).

Their analysis included 16 trials for treating colds, with a total of 1,387 participants. Intake of zinc was associated with a significant reduction in the duration of the cold, reducing it by about one day. It did not show a benefit in reducing the severity of the symptoms.

Of the 16 trials, 11 showed benefit for zinc, while the others did not. The authors reported that trials showing no benefit have been criticized for using too little zinc or a form that is not bioavailable. (Zinc gluconate is a good choice for bioavailability; more on that in a future post.)

The analysis also included two preventive trials with a total of 394 participants. Both studies found a statistically significant benefit from zinc supplementation with the combined incidence of developing a cold reduced by 36% (0.64, 0.47-0.88).

As for how zinc helps treat or prevent colds, the authors had a few explanations. Zinc ions have an affinity for the receptor sites where the cold virus (rhinovirus) attaches to the nasal passages. It can bind both to the virus and to the nasal passages, thus blocking the ability of the virus to attach. Zinc might also prevent the formation of virus proteins, stabilize cell membranes, prevent histamine release, and inhibit prostaglandin metabolism.

The authors suggest treating a cold with 75 mg of zinc per day. They did not give an amount for preventing colds.

I have written before about the idea that some vegans might benefit from a zinc supplement for immune function and wound healing (see the VeganHealth.org article Zinc). A side benefit of zinc supplementation is that it can prevent cadmium absorption (see the Zinc and Alzheimer’s Disease section of the VeganHealth.org article Cadmium).

Personally, I have taken zinc for a number of years now and I have never had so few colds; those I’ve had have lasted less than a day rather than the usual week. So, whether it is a placebo or a coincidence, I continue to take zinc religiously, in two daily doses of 3.75 mg (as part of a Trader Joe’s calcium, magnesium, and zinc supplement).

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References

1. Singh M, Das RR. Zinc for the common cold. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 Jun 18;6:CD001364. | link

Dr. Greger: Volume 17 is Out!

February 9th, 2014 by Jack Norris RD

Dr. Michael Greger’s Latest in Clinical Nutrition Volume 17 DVD is now available.

Check it out at NutritionFacts.org!

Vitamin K2: Bones Part 1: Clinical Trial from The Netherlands

February 7th, 2014 by Jack Norris RD

It appears that I have exhausted the research on vitamin K2 and heart disease that measures direct outcomes in humans. I will summarize that research soon.

In the meantime, I have just finished reading a 2013 double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial on the MK-7 version of vitamin K2 conducted in The Netherlands (1).

The study included 244 healthy postmenopausal women who received either 180 µg of MK-7 or a placebo in one daily dose for 3 years. Bone measurements were taken after 1, 2, and 3 years.

There were so many measurements of bone health taken in the study at various parts of the skeleton that it would be tedious to read a list of each of them and what was found. Suffice it to say that there were some statistically significant reductions in bone deterioration in the treatment group that tended not to appear until the 3rd year. There was also a trend towards fewer moderate vertebral fractures in the treatment group, but the numbers were too small to determine statistical significance. To me, the trends seem too strong to be due simply to taking so many measurements that by chance some benefits were found from the treatment.

One caveat is that the trial was funded by Nattopharma, a company that makes an MK-7 supplement.

It should be noted that 180 µg of MK-7 is a much higher dose than you can get from animal products. In the Prospect-EPIC study, MK-7 intake from animal products ranged only from 0 – 2.2 µg (2). In contrast, the fermented soybean product, natto, has much higher amounts of MK-7 (about 775 µg per 100 g (3)).

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References

1. Knapen MH, Drummen NE, Smit E, Vermeer C, Theuwissen E. Three-year low-dose menaquinone-7 supplementation helps decrease bone loss in healthy postmenopausal women. Osteoporos Int. 2013 Sep;24(9):2499-507. | link

2. Gast GC, de Roos NM, Sluijs I, Bots ML, Beulens JW, Geleijnse JM, Witteman JC, Grobbee DE, Peeters PH, van der Schouw YT. A high menaquinone intake reduces the incidence of coronary heart disease. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2009 Sep;19(7):504-10. | link

3. Abstract of: Tsukamoto Y, Ichise H, Kakuda H, Yamaguchi M. Intake of fermented soybean (natto) increases circulating vitamin K2 (menaquinone-7) and gamma-carboxylated osteocalcin concentration in normal individuals. J Bone Miner Metab. 2000;18(4):216-22. | link

Vitamin K2 Part 4: Germany & LDL

February 4th, 2014 by Jack Norris RD

A reader pointed out an abstract of a cohort study looking at heart disease and vitamin K2 intake (1), the only one I’ve seen that was not from The Netherlands.

In this case it was the EPIC-Heidelberg cohort from Germany and their findings disagreed with The Netherlands studies depicted in the previous K2 posts.

Vitamin K1 was found to be inversely associated with a fatal heart attack (.49, .25-.94), while vitamin K2 was not associated with incidence (1.21, .81–1.80) or fatal (1.09, .46–2.62) heart disease.

Results were adjusted for smoking, body mass index, waist circumference, hypercholesterolemia, high blood pressure, aspirin use, physical activity, education, and intakes of energy, fat, alcohol, calcium, and folate.

In another short report, a letter to Lancet described a trial in which people on dialysis with osteoporosis were given 45 mg/day of vitamin K2 (2). After six months, their LDL cholesterol had gone from 225 to 195 mg/dl. After treatment was discontinued, cholesterol levels returned to normal.

A couple caveats about this: 45 mg/day of vitamin K2 is about 1,000 times more than a normal intake, and these are very high LDL levels in a rather ill population which might not apply to healthy people.

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References

1. Nimptsch K, Rohrmann S, Linseisen J, Kaaks R. Dietary intake of vitamin K and risk of incident and fatal myocardial infarction in the EPIC-Heidelberg cohort study Gesundheitswesen 2010; 72: V143-DOI: 10.1055/s-0030-1266323 | link

2. Nagasawa Y, Fujii M, Kajimoto Y, Imai E, Hori M. Vitamin K2 and serum cholesterol in patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Lancet. 1998 Mar 7;351(9104):724. | link

Please support JackNorrisRD.com!

February 3rd, 2014 by Jack Norris RD

Since my last request for support, these have been the more popular posts:

Eat Right for Your Type: Debunked Again?
Clinical Trial of Methylcobalamin
Austrian Vegetarians: Good News?

But the most popular post by far was…drum roll please…

Petition: Veggie Burger at McDonalds

I read a survey not long ago that found one of the main reasons people do not go vegan is from not having options in restaurants. So, my readers are apparently savvy about this importance of this issue.

By the way, that petition still needs 56,000 more people to sign, so please keep passing it on.

Wile my vitamin K2 series has some ardent followers, they are not many in number. Frankly, I’d much rather be beating up on the blood type diet, but K2 is a topic that anti-vegans bring up a lot and the research seems important, so I will plug on with it.

If you feel this work is worthy of support, please see how in the box below. Thank you!

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Petition: Veggie Burger at McDonalds

January 29th, 2014 by Jack Norris RD

Circa 2003, McDonalds had a veggie burger in many of their Southern California locations (see the article McDonald’s launches Veggie Burger in Southern California). I had it a few times and it was quite good. McDonalds says that it was not a popular item, so they removed it.

Ten years later, maybe it’s time they tried it again. Kathy Freston is circulating a petition on Change.org, McDonald’s: It’s Time For A Healthy, Meatless Option (Please!).

I’m not getting behind this effort so that hardcore vegans have something to eat at McDonalds, but rather for the number of animals that could be spared a lifetime of suffering just from meat-eaters trying this burger and eating it occasionally. Why order two big macs, when you can lose weight and reduce your risk of heart disease and diabetes by ordering just one Big Mac and a McVeggie?

Clinical Trial of Methylcobalamin

January 28th, 2014 by Jack Norris RD

I’m taking another break from vitamin K2 to report on a study that a reader passed on regarding methylcobalamin (1).

There has been very little testing of methylcobalamin and so I normally recommend taking cyanocobalamin because it is a more stable form of vitamin B12 and there are anecdotal reports of people needing large doses of methylcobalamin to achieve results.

A 2011 clinical trial from Korea sheds some light on this issue. The study was done with people who had their stomachs removed (gastrectomy) due to cancer. Patients who have had a gastrectomy can no longer produce intrinsic factor, a molecule required for efficient B12 absorption, and they are typically given B12 injections.

In this trial, patients took 1,500 µg of methylcobalamin each day.

At baseline, their B12 levels were an average of 170 pg/ml and 24 out of 30 had tingling in their hands and feet, the traditional sign of vitamin B12 deficiency. Many had other indicators as well, including elevated homocysteine (an average of 17.5 µg/l). Over the course of the 3 month trial, vitamin B12 levels steadily increased to an average of 810 pg/ml, homocysteine steadily decreased to 11.4 µg/l, 28 patients experienced symptom relief, and 16 patients were free of all symptoms.

A drawback to this trial is that it did not have a placebo group; all the patients knew they were receiving vitamin B12. But these results are, in my opinion, too impressive to be due simply to placebo and based on the homocysteine and symptom improvement, it appears safe to say that 1,500 µg per day of methylcobalamin should be enough for just about anyone.

I have added a paragraph about this study to the Methylcobalamin & Adenosylcobalamin page at VeganHealth.org

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References

1. Kim HI, Hyung WJ, Song KJ, Choi SH, Kim CB, Noh SH. Oral vitamin B12 replacement: an effective treatment for vitamin B12 deficiency after total gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients. Ann Surg Oncol. 2011 Dec;18(13):3711-7. | link