AnimalVoices Interview Part Two

On January 4th, I posted Part 1 of my interview with Erin O’Sullivan of Animal Voices podcast:

Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Vegan Nutrition But Were Afraid to Ask, Part 1

Part 2 is now available:

Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Vegan Nutrition But Were Afraid to Ask, Part 2

Of the interviews I’ve done, these are my two favorite because we covered so many things other than the 10 nutrients vegans need to be aware of and vegetarian disease rate statistics. Erin’s questions were great! I look forward to her coming up with another batch some time.

You can support JackNorrisRd.com by purchasing anything through these links

Vegan for Life: Everything You Need to Know to Be Healthy and Fit on a Plant-Based Diet from Amazon.com

4 Responses to “AnimalVoices Interview Part Two”

  1. Sharky Says:

    Grreat interview, Jack. I thoroughly enjoyed it. The nutrition blogosphere, from the WPF to 30BAD, can seem like a crazy carnival, so I appreciate your careful attention to what the science says.

    quick question: ground flaxseed, cooked or uncooked, does it matter?

  2. Jack Norris RD Says:

    Thanks, Sharky!

    > quick question: ground flaxseed, cooked or uncooked, does it matter?

    My understanding is that ground flaxseeds can be baked without damaging their omega-3.

  3. kate scott Says:

    I haven’t heard Part 2 yet but Part 1 was great – you sound so sensible and sane – and knowledgable. But let me check that I heard this right – you shouldn’t eat raw green peas? I understand about not eating other legumes (kidney beans and so on) raw – but raw peas are a problem? This is how they are nicest – fresh picked!

  4. Jack Norris RD Says:

    kate,

    Thanks for the kind words! If you can digest them, then I don’t see any problem eating raw peas. Most legumes are pretty hard to digest eaten raw – peas right off the bush are an exception. If someone was to base a large portion of their diet on raw peas (which I don’t think you are suggesting) then the binding of nutrients by phytic acid might become a problem (see here: http://jacknorrisrd.com/?p=3542). Then again, it looks like the vegetable pea varieties are not especially high in phytic acid compared to other legumes: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF01088088?LI=true

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